Michelle Obama’s School Lunches In Pictures: “Is That Photo Taken From Death Row?”

One of the purported successes of Michelle Obama’s tenure as First Lady of the United States has been to help Americans get fit and eat right.

She’s launched a wide array of initiatives targeting Americans receiving government nutritional benefits, as well as school lunch programs across the nation. Nowhere have the First Lady’s efforts been more visible than in the cafeteria’s of America’s schools.

Within days of Obama’s new USDA regulations taking hold parents and schoolchildren launched complaints surrounding the rationing of meals, a move that left kids hungry and school districts frustrated with all of the additional paperwork and program expenses. The USDA subsequently upped the rations to assuage frustration.

But according to America’s kids Michelle Obama has been “out to lunch” when it comes to satisfying hunger. It’s so bad, in fact, that black markets for food have popped up in schools and kids are taking to their social media pages to share their outrage.

Do you want to see what Michelle Obama considers eating right? Check out these pictures and comments – sourced directly from government run cafeterias around the country.

As you see what passes for health food these days keep in mind that school’s are increasingly restricting children from bringing their own lunches from home, often citing nutritional requirements as the reason.

An appetizing ham and cheese tortilla wrap:

Chili cheese dog with a side of veggies:

Can I get another scoop of brown with a sprinkle of yellow? Oh, and don’t forget my biscuit!

Seconds anyone?

Students weigh in:

 

 

When mom joined her daughter for lunch, here’s the wonderful meal prepared by the caring cafeteria staff:

 

On the flip side, here is what Michelle Obama’s children enjoy for lunch at the Sidwell Friends school attended by her daughters Sasha and Malia. In this particular case the school was paying a tribute to Pearl Harbor Day and the kids feasted on Asian Mushroom Soup, Oriental Noodle Salad, Teriyaki Marinated Chicken Strips, Garlic Roasted Edamame, Vegetable Fried Rice and Fortune Cookies for dessert:

sidwell friends - lunch

And of course, how can we talk about healthy eating, school lunches, and Michelle Obama without mentioning the White House organic vegetable garden? The First Lady shows of her green thumb in the picture below. It turns out, however, that because of her busy schedule she didn’t actually grow any of her food. The White House gardeners did, and they did a heck of a job.

michelle-obama-gardener

Straight from America’s organic gardens to school lunch tables coast to coast.


SHTF Plan – When It Hits The Fan, Don’t Say We Didn’t Warn You

Should Your Kids Know How to Bug Out…from School?

This article has been contributed by Daisy Luther of The Organic Prepper and author of The Pantry Primer.

kids-bug-out

There are many alarming trends throughout the American public school system, and one of the most unsettling relates to “terror drills.”

Paul Joseph Watson of Infowars wrote last week about “lockdown drills” run by the DHS:

The Department of Homeland Security is expanding its operations by running unannounced school lockdown drills, another sign of the federal agency’s encroachment into more areas of Americans’ lives.

“On Thursday, March 6, a team comprised of ten officials from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, the Essex County Prosecutor’s Office, and the NJ Department of Education’s Safety and Security Task Forces visited Glen Ridge High School to conduct an unannounced school lock-down drill,” reports Georgette Gilmore

While authorities justify school lockdown drills as necessary exercises to prepare for potential school shootings, the likelihood of one happening is miniscule. Critics have pointed to the fact that the drills achieve little else than traumatizing school children.

Some have also argued that teaching kids to “shelter in place” rather than evacuate the scene of a shooting is bad advice because it is likely to lead to more casualties. The process of having children submit to armed masked men during school lockdown drills is also contradictory in that it teaches them to behave exactly the same way towards an actual gunman.(source)

But a quick drill with guns pointed at children is not even the worst of the drills being performed. Another type of drill began occurring in 2012. These are called “evacuation drills” or “relocation drills” and the kids are put on a bus and taken to a location that is not disclosed to parents. Michael Snyder wrote:

All over the United States, school children are being taken out of their classrooms, put on buses and sent to “alternate locations” during terror drills…In the years since 9/11 and the Columbine school shootings, there has been a concerted effort to make school emergency drills much more “realistic” and much more intense.    Unfortunately, the fact that many of these drills are deeply traumatizing many children does not seem to bother too many people.  Do we really need to have “active shooter” drills where men point guns at our kids and fire blanks at them?  Do we really need to have “relocation drills” where kids are rapidly herded on to buses and told that they must surrender their cell phones because they will not be allowed to call anyone? (source)

During these drills kids are not allowed to phone their parents and parents are not even allowed to know where their children are in many cases.  In some incidences during which the school forewarns parents about the drill, the parents are told that they cannot pick up their children “for any reason” during the drill.  Many schools now boast of having supplies to keep children at the school for 48 hours in the event of an “emergency” during which time the children will not be released to their parents.

And it gets even worse. In the name of predictive programming, do you recall a “drill” during which the police took over a school and practiced fighting “angry parents”?  I’ve been plenty annoyed at different schools my daughter has attended, but in no way have I been compelled to attack the school, requiring SWAT teams to defend it against me and my band of likewise irate moms.

In fact, there’s only one scenario I can imagine in which parents would storm the school to take back their children.  Mac Slavo of SHTFplan wrote about it:

Let’s consider the circumstances that would have to occur for not one, but two or more parents to lay armed siege to a school.

There’s only one real scenario that comes to mind, and you’d more than likely have to be a prepper or conspiracy theorist to even contemplate the possibility.

The schools which our kids attend have “shelter-in-place” emergency procedures that would be enacted in the event of an emergency such as a nuclear, chemical or biological attack. During these emergencies schools are to be locked down with no unofficial access into the buildings until the all-clear has been given. It’s unclear based on district procedures just what the shelter-in-place order means and what steps parents would need to take to get their kids out of school – or whether they could even take their kids out of school based on the emergency.

But basically, it boils down to this: If there is a widespread emergency, and a school locks down and refuses parental access to children, then and only then could we envision a scenario where parents might take it upon themselves to evacuate their children by force.

The ‘event’ in question would likely need to be mass scale, or perceived as mass scale, in order for a parent to be so adamant about getting their child out of the school that they would take to armed violence to get them out.

Is this what police are training for?

Someone, somewhere obviously thinks there is a legitimate reason for this type of training simulation. (source)

So when you put all of this together, it’s easy to see the future. The picture this is painting is that one day, a unilateral decision could be made to put our children on a bus, take them to an undisclosed location, and keep them. (Dave Hodges wrote a chilling article about the role of FEMA in these scenarios – you can read it HERE.)

Should you teach your child to escape?

Maybe it’s time to teach your child how to bug out from school.

By no means am I suggesting that this is a legitimate course of action for every child.  Some kids are too young or too prone to panic and poor judgement to safely bug out. Some environments are too dangerous for a young person to take off on his or her own.  Parents have to consider the skills and mindset of their kids before making plans like this. It can definitely be risky, and you have to compare it to the alternative of having your child herded along.

I have a huge amount of faith in my child. So much so that we have performed some of our own drills.  She attends a part-day advanced science program at a school 13 miles from our home.  She’s a lot more “aware” of events going on in the world than most of her peers because we discuss things like government encroachment and tyranny on a regular basis. She knows that she is not to get on a bus without my prior knowledge and consent.

If, out of the blue, the teachers just tell students to get on a bus, and there is no compelling reason for them to be doing so, it might be time for your child to use his or her own judgement on whether boarding that conveyance is actually a good idea.

If you feel that a school bug-out plan is a good idea for your child, here are a few things to consider:

  • If there are younger siblings at the school, your older children will need to plan how to connect with them, and whether or not to abort the bug-out if they can’t connect with the younger ones.
  • You need to set up a primary and secondary rally point where you’ll meet your kids.  This should be within a couple of miles of the school, and it should be a place where your children can stay hidden from the main road. The plan should always be to go to the primary rally point, but if for some reason that is unsafe or unaccessible, there should be a secondary rally point that is reached by a different route.
  • Figure out the route your child will take to get to the rally point.  Practice getting there from the school.  If possible, for reasons of safety and stealth, develop a route that does not use the main road to take them there. Hike or walk this route with your child until they are completely comfortable with it.
  • There are some situations in which evacuation is actually necessary. For example, some places are prone to forest fires and you wouldn’t want your child out on foot in such a scenario.  If the school building were to collapse, it’s obvious the children would be relocated to a safe shelter. This is the point at which your child’s judgement comes into play. It is vital to discuss different scenarios in which evacuation is necessary.

It is also important that your child have the proper gear to take off on foot, as well as the ability to use all of it.  It’s important to practice things like filtering water in order for a young person to feel confident doing so.

  • A hiking pack (My daughter keeps this  Signpost Outdoor Packable Handy Backpack Foldable Lightweight Travel Bag Daypack – Green in the bottom of her school bag)
  • Comfortable weather-appropriate footwear (winter boots, sneakers, etc.)
  • Water filtration bottle (we use THIS ONE from Berkey)
  • At least one full water bottle, but preferably two
  • Snacks like granola bars or energy bars (Clif Bars are made with good ingredients and are very filling)
  • Weather appropriate clothing (snow gear, light hoodie, gloves, hat for sun or warmth)
  • Fire-starting flint
  • Space blanket
  • First aid kit (band-aids are a must forpotential blisters)
  • Extra socks

Most of the other gear that you’d prefer your child to have is going to be deemed “dangerous” by the school.  Things like multi-tools, matches or lighters, or self-defense items are frowned upon and can result in anything from suspension by a “zero-tolerance” school system that seems unable to differentiate between a tool and a threat, to felony charges by the overzealous “justice system.” These are things you must take into consideration when choosing items for the emergency kit, and you have to weigh the pros against the cons.

Will this work for you?

This is not a plan that will work for every family. Only you can judge whether or not your child or teen can keep a cool enough head to execute a similar plan and use their own judgement in a surprise situation. Only you can assess the immediate environment and decide if it is safer for your student to set out on their own or to go with the staff from the school.

Do any of you have a simliar plan for your kids? Please share your suggestions in the comments below.

NOTEThis is not a debate about whether children should be educated at home or via the public school system. This is about a specific situation that affects many families in America who have made the decision to send their children to school based on their own personal circumstances or the availability of special programs.


The Pantry Primer

Please feel free to share any information from this article in part or in full, giving credit to the author and including a link to The Organic Prepper and the following bio.

Daisy Luther is the author of The Pantry Primer: How to Build a One Year Food Supply in Three Months.  Her website, The Organic Prepper, offers information on healthy prepping, including premium nutritional choices, general wellness and non-tech solutions. You can follow Daisy on Facebook and Twitter, and you can email her at daisy@theorganicprepper.ca

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SHTF Plan – When It Hits The Fan, Don’t Say We Didn’t Warn You

I’m stunned by the tragic death of Phil Hoffman. We went to high school together, but few of us had any idea he would become such a star.

Philip Seymour Hoffman as Willy Loman in "Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman."  (Photo credit: New York Times)

Philip Seymour Hoffman as Willy Loman in “Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman.” (Photo credit: New York Times)

Lynn and I just heard the news of the death of Philip Seymour Hoffman, apparently of a heroin overdose. We feel so sick and so sad. Grieving for him. Grieving for his family. And his friends. We are praying for each of them to find Christ’s comfort at this hour. Praying they experience what the Apostle Paul calls “the peace that passes all comprehension” in Philippians chapter four. When we were growing up in the same town in Upstate New York (Fairport), we all knew him simply as “Phil.” We were in the same graduating class of about 575. I remember seeing him in the Fairport High School senior year drama in “Death of a Salesman.” He played the lead, Willy Loman, and he was phenomenal. It was stunning how good. Phil had always been a class clown. I had no idea until then he could act at all much less so well. We all knew at that point that he could be a breakout, but did any of us in the Class of ’85 really know how huge a star he’d become? Indeed, after graduating from New York University, he became one of the most impressive and celebrated actors of our generation. Oscar award winner. Tony award winner. You name it, he won it. A few years ago I took Lynn to see Phil play Willy Loman in “Death of a Salesman” – but this time on Broadway. He’d been amazing in high school, but he was, of course, even far more effective after years of training and experience — which made a sad and tragic play 1000 times sadder. I remember seeing him first in Scent of a Woman. Twister was fantastic. Hunger Games, too, and so many other of his films and TV shows. My favorite has to be Mission Impossible when Tom Cruise disguises himself as Phil Hoffman! I sat in the theater blown away. Suddenly, Cruise (the biggest box office star of our time) was gone. It was just Phil vs. Phil on the silver screen. Though we grew up in the same town and went to the same schools, I never knew him really. But I’ve prayed for him often, and for all the Raiders of ’85. I am heartbroken he struggled so much to find hope in this world and that he is gone so soon, and so tragically. Good bye, Phil. You will be deeply missed.


Joel C. Rosenberg’s Blog