The Importance of a Survival Garden

Non Hybrid Seed packs Survival Gardening the Preppers Universe way!

It’s important not to get caught up in our newest survival gadgets and to start thinking about long term survival through survival gardening.  Let’s face it food is a basic human need, being resilient and having the ability to grow your own food is important for survival.  Emergency freeze dried foods will not last forever.  Survival gardens offer you a chance to produce highly nutritious food for you’re family. 

In recent years, survival gardens have enjoyed a resurgence as people look for ways to grow their own emergency food supply.  Gardens can be grown just about anywhere from backyards, apartments and community gardens.  There are container gardens, vertical gardens, raised bed gardens.  In fact, the options on gardening are numerous and at times can be down right confusing. 

Being skilled in gardening gives you an advantage in a post disaster situation.  Not having to eat freeze dried food and/or out of a can is a delicacy not many can enjoy.  Most people in a post disaster situation will be pillaging for food within 3 or 4 days.  They simply are not prepared for the long haul.  Additionally, canning you’re own food can be fun and provide you with long term food storage.  Sign up for my newsletter at the end of this post and receive my EBook “The survival guide to canning & preserving” for FREE.

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When starting you’re own survival garden there are a few things to keep in mind.  The first thing is deciding where to plant you’re garden.  Is it in you’re backyard, on your patio, in a raised bed, or a vertical garden?  Is the garden going to be inside or outside?  How much light is available in the area for gardening?  Are you growing in pots?  Are there other options that would work well?  As you can tell, there are many decisions and considerations when planning you’re garden.

There are many advantages to growing you’re garden in raised beds.  Raised beds are the best option for most people and produce the best results in a small space.  Survival type gardens thrive in raised beds and produce the most abundant and nutritious food because you have total control on the potting soil and there usually isn’t a problem with weeds.

Here are a few advantages of raised beds:

  • Soil warms up faster in the spring
  • Water drains easily
  • Garden is tended from the edges, soil does not get compacted from walking on it
  • Loose soil is easier for seeding, transplanting and weeding
  • Grow more vegetables in smaller spaces
  • Grow safely even when the land is poor and heavily saturated with heavy metals
  • Fewer tools needed to help plant and care for the garden

Once you figured out where you’re garden will be planted, the next step is planning.  A garden plan is essential in making you’re garden grow efficiently and abundantly.  For example, does you’re plant need full sunlight, partial sunlight or if they grow in the shade.  Does one plant complement another?  Here is an excellent “Sample Planting Guide for Raised-Bed Gardens“.

Once you start with these beginning steps, you are well on your way to feeding you’re family for years with nutritious foods from you’re survival garden.  A garden is an easy thing to start but it does take time and effort to make it thrive.  However, in the end it is worth it for the fresh food, the money you will save, and the new survival skills learned. It will help you feed you’re family in the regular world and in the post disaster apocalyptic situations or as preppers like to say WTSHTF.

Rodney Butler

 

 

 

By Rodney Butler

 

PS…Are you are asking you’re self – How do I begin?  The key is to start small and have fun.  Buy your self a few books on gardening and visit websites to help you in you’re ventures.  Here is an excellent e-Book for the beginner “How to grow herbs and veggies in your small Kitchen Garden“.  This would be a great place to start and then you can grow your garden as big as you want once you get started and learn the basics.

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