Michelle Obama’s School Lunches In Pictures: “Is That Photo Taken From Death Row?”

One of the purported successes of Michelle Obama’s tenure as First Lady of the United States has been to help Americans get fit and eat right.

She’s launched a wide array of initiatives targeting Americans receiving government nutritional benefits, as well as school lunch programs across the nation. Nowhere have the First Lady’s efforts been more visible than in the cafeteria’s of America’s schools.

Within days of Obama’s new USDA regulations taking hold parents and schoolchildren launched complaints surrounding the rationing of meals, a move that left kids hungry and school districts frustrated with all of the additional paperwork and program expenses. The USDA subsequently upped the rations to assuage frustration.

But according to America’s kids Michelle Obama has been “out to lunch” when it comes to satisfying hunger. It’s so bad, in fact, that black markets for food have popped up in schools and kids are taking to their social media pages to share their outrage.

Do you want to see what Michelle Obama considers eating right? Check out these pictures and comments – sourced directly from government run cafeterias around the country.

As you see what passes for health food these days keep in mind that school’s are increasingly restricting children from bringing their own lunches from home, often citing nutritional requirements as the reason.

An appetizing ham and cheese tortilla wrap:

Chili cheese dog with a side of veggies:

Can I get another scoop of brown with a sprinkle of yellow? Oh, and don’t forget my biscuit!

Seconds anyone?

Students weigh in:

 

 

When mom joined her daughter for lunch, here’s the wonderful meal prepared by the caring cafeteria staff:

 

On the flip side, here is what Michelle Obama’s children enjoy for lunch at the Sidwell Friends school attended by her daughters Sasha and Malia. In this particular case the school was paying a tribute to Pearl Harbor Day and the kids feasted on Asian Mushroom Soup, Oriental Noodle Salad, Teriyaki Marinated Chicken Strips, Garlic Roasted Edamame, Vegetable Fried Rice and Fortune Cookies for dessert:

sidwell friends - lunch

And of course, how can we talk about healthy eating, school lunches, and Michelle Obama without mentioning the White House organic vegetable garden? The First Lady shows of her green thumb in the picture below. It turns out, however, that because of her busy schedule she didn’t actually grow any of her food. The White House gardeners did, and they did a heck of a job.

michelle-obama-gardener

Straight from America’s organic gardens to school lunch tables coast to coast.


SHTF Plan – When It Hits The Fan, Don’t Say We Didn’t Warn You

RED SCREEN OF DEATH: White House Plans to Turn Over Control of Internet to Totalitarian Regimes

Guest post by Investor’s Business Daily

Error 404: U.S. officials plan to relinquish federal control over the administration of the Internet to something called the “global Internet community,” which is full of tyrants to whom the free flow of information is a threat.

In the wake of the NSA surveillance scandal, some might not be inclined to defend federal involvement in anything related to the flow of information between individuals.

But the decision announced Friday by the Commerce Department to give up next year its oversight of Icann, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, to the “global Internet community” is a bad idea.

Under a Commerce Department contract, Icann has issued domain names since 2000. But the Los Angeles-based nonprofit has worked, encouraged by states and groups not necessarily dedicated to free expression, to transform itself into a global organization free of U.S. ties.

Since at least 2004, the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) has tried repeatedly to wrest power from Icann. During a meeting in Dubai last year, the ITU, the telecom branch of the United Nations, demanded rules governing the Internet be rewritten. It proposed inspection authority that would allow it to monitor and censor otherwise encrypted content on the Internet.

In 2008, the Internet trade journal Cnet reported the ITU was quietly drafting technical standards, proposed by the Chinese government, to define methods of tracing the original source of Internet communications and potentially curbing the ability of users to remain anonymous. Regimes in places such as Russia and Iran also want an ITU rule letting them monitor traffic routed through or to their countries, allowing them to eavesdrop or block access.

The Obama administration calls the move to relinquish Internet oversight the “multi-stakeholder model of Internet governance,” as announced by Lawrence E. Strickling, assistant secretary of commerce for communications and information. “We look forward to Icann convening stakeholders across the global Internet community to craft an appropriate transition plan.”

Hamadoun Toure, secretary-general of the ITU, released a report in May 2013 outlining groundwork for Internet governance and regulatory topics. The report calls for the creation of “global principles for the governance and use of the Internet” and proposes the resolution of issues pertaining to “use of Internet resources for purposes that are inconsistent with international peace, stability and security.”

Just what does using the Internet in ways “inconsistent with international peace, stability and security” mean?

Would it mean a Ukrainian sending tweets telling Moscow to get out of Crimea or creating a blog documenting the assault on Ukrainian sovereignty?

Before Russia invaded Georgia in 2008, Moscow launched attacks against its Internet infrastructure with coordinated barrages of millions of requests, known as distributed denial-of-service attacks, which overloaded and effectively shut down Georgian servers.

Today, the largely self-regulating Internet means no one has to ask for permission to launch a site and no government can tell network operators how to do their jobs. The Internet freely crosses international boundaries, making it difficult for governments to censor. To many governments, the Internet is a threat to statist goals.

“While I certainly agree our nation must stridently review our procedures regarding surveillance in light of the NSA controversy, to put ourselves in a situation where censorship-laden governments like China or Russia could take a firm hold on the Internet itself is truly a scary thought,” Sen. Tim Scott, R-S.C., says in Politico.

No doubt the Obama administration views U.S. Internet control as an example of U.S. exceptionalism and bullying, for which it constantly apologizes. As Scott notes, there is great danger here, for the “global Internet community” that the Obama administration would empower has no First Amendment.


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Doug Ross @ Journal