HOUSE REPORT: Holder Lied to Congress, But Please Don’t Let That Stop the Amnesty and Obamacare Trains!

Now, if the House of Representatives was actually serious about the Obama administration’s serial perjurious testimony, it might actually do something drastic. Like defund Obamacare and kill any talk of Amnesty. But I’m guessing that, despite this report, nothing at all will change.

House Republicans released a report Wednesday and “formally accused” Attorney General Eric Holder of misleading Congress with his “deceptive” testimony back in May, Fox News reported.

After reporting their findings, lawmakers sent a letter to President Obama saying they have “grave concerns” about Holder and called for a “change in leadership” at the Department of Justice.

Holder, testifying before the Judiciary Committee on May 15 on DOJ leaks investigations, said he “knew nothing” about the “potential prosecution” of Fox News reporter James Rosen, when actually, it was reported later, Holder himself approved the warrant for Rosen’s email communications.

“With regard to potential prosecution of the press for the disclosure of material, that is not something that I have ever been involved, heard of, or would think would be a wise policy,” Holder then testified to the Judiciary Committee.

However, a House committee investigation concluded Holder’s testimony was “deceptive and misleading.”

Translation: Holder lied under oath, which — last I checked — was a crime.

I’ll believe the House is serious when they act serious. Schmucks.

Hat tip: BadBlue News.

Doug Ross @ Journal

“In Virtually Every Single Case the Citizens Who Were Ultimately Murdered Never Saw It Coming”

While the NSA, FBI and other intelligence agencies mine and collect trillions of domestic electronic interactions of every American citizen, a large portion of the population simply assumes that nothing will ever come of it. “If I’m not doing anything wrong,” they say, “then who cares?”

True. Today you can go out, join a protest, scream to your heart’s content at Occupy and Tea Party assemblies, and under the First Amendment you are free to go about your business once done. You can insult politicians. You can discuss ‘conspiracy theories’ with your friends. You can post to forums, blogs and social networks and be totally immune from state-sponsored persecution and prosecution based on your beliefs and ideologies.

All the while, the government is cataloging your every interaction – who you’ve spoken with, where you’ve been, you’re political inclinations, religious beliefs, and your purchasing habits.

The data, for all intents and purposes, isn’t being used for any real overt purpose right here and now.

But as we’ve seen throughout history, governments change, as do the legalities of certain activities.

This week the U.S. Fifth Circuit court issued a ruling allowing the government to capture cell phone data without a warrant.

Ruling 2 to 1, the court said a warrantless search was “not per se unconstitutional” because location data was “clearly a business record” and therefore not protected by the Fourth Amendment.

At first glance, this may seem like no big deal, but as Karl Denninger explains, it may have serious life altering implications – not today, or tomorrow, but perhaps five years or a decade down the road.

That is, exactly what the NSA is grabbing from all cell carriers in bulk without a warrant.

“In bulk” means for everyone.

All the time.

The root of the problem here is not that it might lead to you “right now.”  It’s that the data, once acquired is never erased and thus becomes a record that can be used at any time in the future if it becomes politically (or otherwise) expedient to use in order to implicate you in something.

The usual argument on the other side is something along the lines of “I’m not doing anything wrong so I don’t care.”  Uh huh.

You’re a rather trusting sort, you know.  After all, there is no evidence that the government would ever turn into something evil at any time in your lifetime and then use that data to ex-post-facto link you to something they don’t like — right?

There’s no history of governments doing things like this, is there?  Oh wait — there is.  There are in fact dozens of such instances through history, and in virtually every single case the citizens who were ultimately murdered as a consequence never saw it coming 5, 10 or 20 years down the road because at the time they “consented” the evil thing wasn’t happening — yet.

The most-obvious of course is the Jews in Nazi Germany, but by no means the only example.  Indeed, the history when it comes to privately-owned arms is that material and serious constraints on their personal ownership tend to come 10 or 20 years before the citizens are murdered by their very own government.

This is much-more-insideous in that these “records” can be — and will be — used to link you to a political protest (e.g. “you were at the Washington Mall during the time that xxxx happened”) and while today that’s considered a protected activity who says it will be tomorrow?

The real error here is that “business records” are not accorded 4th Amendment protections.  Why not?  I give the cell company access to my location not because I want them to have it but because it is necessary for their systems to know where I am for the service I am contracting for to work.

The very premise under which the court ruled is incorrect — if you and I agree that you may have some piece of information for the purpose of providing me a service or good that does not mean that I am giving you license to use it for whatever other purpose you may cook up later on.

If we cannot get our government to respect the fact that private citizens and private companies have the right to allocate information for specific purposes and that doing so does not give a general level of permission to either entity to then use that data outside of the specific purpose for which it was negotiated then we need a new government that does respect that fact.

Period.

Via Market Ticker

Why do you think they’re collecting this data and investing hundreds of billions of dollars into massive NSA data centers where they can store, process and cross reference this data? These aren’t just shovel-ready Obama jobs to boost the economy.

There is a plan in place, and one day all of this data will be utilized by the government. And as we know, it’s never for the benefit of the people.

Everything you do right now is being monitored, and one day soon they’re going to use that data against you.

Let’s just hope the penalties for future violations based on past transgressions don’t come in the form of being lined up against a wall.

nazi-execution

Of course, such things can’t possibly happen in the “modern” world, so we have nothing to worry about.


SHTF Plan – When It Hits The Fan, Don’t Say We Didn’t Warn You

FROM THE MAN WHO BROUGHT YOU SOLYNDRA: More Laughable Lies and Phony Numbers for a Failed Economy

Guest post by Investors Business Daily

Energy Policy: The president falsely claims that the jobs created by the pipeline from Canada would be but a “blip relative to the need,” ignoring his own State Department and the unions that support him.

At the rate President Obama is going, he may claim that building the Keystone XL pipeline will actually cost jobs. In an interview with the New York Times last Saturday, he argued that the best estimate is 2,000 initial construction jobs followed by no more than an additional 100 jobs, a mere “blip.”

The newspaper’s transcript of the interview showed Obama chuckling dismissively as he made his point.

Then on Tuesday, in a jobs speech in Chattanooga, the president ratcheted that number downward. “They keep on talking about this — an oil pipeline coming down from Canada that’s estimated to create about 50 permanent jobs. That’s not a jobs plan.”

No, Mr. President, it’s part of a plan to boost an economy that will create private-sector jobs, as your own State Department has told you.

After five years of review and many studies, the State Department found that “including direct, indirect and induced effects, the proposed (Keystone) project would potentially support approximately 42,100 average annual jobs across the United States over a one- to two-year construction period.”

Granted, these are not permanent jobs. But the number is a lot bigger than the 2,000 Obama claimed on Saturday.

The southern leg of the project, from Cushing, Okla., to the Gulf of Mexico, which didn’t need the president’s or the State Department’s approval, has already created 4,000 jobs as workers lay and align the 425-mile stretch of pipeline, according to an Associated Press report.

Yes, these too are temporary jobs, but there will be more permanent positions as well. The Canadian Energy Research Institute predicts that Keystone XL will create 117,000 new U.S. jobs over the next 15 years due to oil sands development linked to the project. Hardly a “blip.”

It’s not unreasonable to conclude that with extensive North American resources being transported, developed and refined, thousands of jobs, not only in the industries directly related but in the industries that feed, clothe and support all these new workers and a growing economy, will be created.

How many exactly, we don’t know, but the number is higher than 50 and certainly larger than the permanent jobs created at solar panel maker Solyndra, which was zero.

Where did the president’s pitiful estimates of 50 come from? In citing that number, he was likely referring to a State Department finding that — after the pipeline is built — it would take roughly 50 people to maintain it.
The figure ignores the 42,100 construction jobs over a two-year period or the hundreds of thousands created through oil sands development and what economists call the “ripple effect.”

As Sean McGarvey, president of the Building and Construction Trades Department at AFL-CIO, said at a pro-Keystone rally just down from the White House on April 24:

“The interstate highway system was a temporary job; Mount Rushmore was a temporary job. If they knew anything about the construction industry they’d understand that we work ourselves out of jobs and we go from job to job to job.”

McGarvey added: “It’s about jobs — that’s what it’s about — put Americans back to work again in an industry that has a 14.7% unemployment rate. It’s good for our economy, it’s good for our country; it’s good for our energy independence and it’s good for working men and women in the building trades.”

Keystone is about jobs, Mr. President — lots of them.

Read More At Investor’s Business Daily

Doug Ross @ Journal