A Eulogy to Hemp: the most dangerous substance in the universe

A Eulogy to Hemp the most dangerous substance in the universe I didn’t really discover cannabis until well into my twenties. I’d smoked a few js back in my late teens, quite enjoyed them but didn’t mix in such circles so forgot about it, gave up smoking altogether and entered the rat-race. I’d been an [...]
Conspiracy Central Blog

Caption Contest

Leave a comment providing the winning caption to the picture above and win a free Moonbattery.com t-shirt, suitable for any formal occasion, courtesy of the esteemed countermoonbats at Party Crasher. The winner will be announced Monday. Free shirts need to be claimed within a week (i.e., I need a mailing address). T-shirts for the contest [...]
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OUR FUTURE UNDER OBAMA: Anti-Austerity Protests Rock Capitals of Spain and Portugal

Tens of thousands of protesters rallied in the capitals of Spain and Portugal to demand ends to the austerity cuts to government spending programs. The Associated Press reported that demonstrators were expressing their anger over tax hikes, government spending cuts and high unemployment rates.

As Margaret Thatcher famously observed, “The trouble with socialism is that eventually you run out of other people’s money.”

This kind of civil unrest will look like a garden party if Barack Obama is reelected and permitted to continue his Cloward-Piven-inspired destruction of the economy.

And, no, you won’t be getting free Obama-Phones if the economy collapses, drones.



Doug Ross @ Journal

How to Build a Fire for Camping

Article by Jonsky Sicuna

The ability to build a fire is is essential because it can still be an invaluable source of heat and a method of signaling. It can also be used to cook in case something goes wrong with your camping stove or you forgot to bring one (which shouldn’t be the case if you use a camping checklist.) You have to be careful though because not every place allows the building of fires.

To Build a Fire..

You need plenty of dry material like tinder, dead pine leaves, dry leaves, thick sticks or small branches. Use anything you can find that is dry. You also need to collect a lot of wood (especially if you plan to use the fire for a long time) and organize it according to size. You can look for dry wood inside of hollow tree stumps or close to the trunks of trees. Whittle away wet bark to find dry wood which can be shaved into tinder. Get as much tinder as possible.

Use an existing fire ring if you find one. If not, make a fire ring by first clearing up the ground of flammable debris or if you build a fire on a grassy area use your camping knife to cut out turf about a foot in diameter and set it aside to replace later when you’re finished with the fire. Try to find an area that is protected from the wind and surround the fire area with a ring of stones.

Next you place a pile of tinder (or any type of fire starter like paper, petroleum jelly, etc) in the center of the fire ring.

Then build a small teepee using small sticks about the size of a pencil. Start with a sticks that balance easily against each other (like a forked stick) to provide a stable frame for which other sticks can lean on.

If any of the sticks are slightly wet, it will be dried by the heat from the burning tinder before they catch fire. Place three medium sized stones around the outside of the stone which can be used to support your cooking pot. Don’t use stones collected from a river bed as they may have absorbed water which could cause the stones to explode when heated.

Sprinkle some more tinder or other flammable material like pieces of paper or pine needle on the outside to the teepee. Use pine pitch also if it is available as it will make a really good fire starter. Gradually add more sticks to the teepee and use larger sticks this time but ideally the sticks should not be bigger than your thumb. Remember to leave a space at one side so you can reach the tinder to light or add more if necessary.

Once this is all done you can reach into the teepee and light up the tinder. As the fire builds up, you can help by blowing into it. Add small pieces of twigs and sticks one piece at a time. You can add bigger sticks when the fire gets big enough. When the teepee has collapsed you can place the pot on the stones and start cooking.

About the Author

Jonsky is a writer for Hiking-Camping-World.com. He recommends that you use camping stoves instead of building a fire for cooking to protect the environment. To keep warm during the night when you sleep, a down sleeping bag and a good tent is usually sufficient.

Use and distribution of this article is subject to our Publisher Guidelines
whereby the original author’s information and copyright must be included.

Jonsky is a writer for Hiking-Camping-World.com. He recommends that you use camping stoves instead of building a fire for cooking to protect the environment. To keep warm during the night when you sleep, a down sleeping bag and a good tent is usually sufficient.

Use and distribution of this article is subject to our Publisher Guidelines
whereby the original author’s information and copyright must be included.